NEMS 2018 — 2018 New England Manipulation Symposium

Investigating Human-Robot Handover Release Behaviors

Zhao Han and Holly Yanco

Poster.
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Before Baxter hands the object it looks at the object full
Human-Robot Handover
News

Introduction

Most human-robot handovers focus on how to approach human receivers and notify the readiness, few have investigated the effects of difference release behaviors of objects.

The whole handover process consists of three phases: the approach phase, the signal phase, and the transfer phase. Failures during the transfer phase have serious consequences:

  • Early releases lead to dropped and broken objects,
  • Not releasing while human receivers desired to takes the object breaks handover fluency and makes human receivers have bad handover experience.

To increase handover fluency and improve handover experience, we developed different manners for robots to release objects during a human-robot handover and plan to conduct a user study to investigate the effects of different types of release behaviors:

  • Rigid release policy: The robot first fully extends its arm and, only when reached, detect pull and release the object in hand.
  • Passive release policy: The robot attempts to extend its arm fully and detect pull along the way, and release the object accordingly. A pull is detected if the exerted force is over a pre-defined threshold during a certain time interval.
  • Proactive release policy: The robot attempts to extend its arm fully and actively detect a force change pattern corresponding to human grasp effort along the way, and release the object early.

Figures

Handover

Baxter is ready to hand the object
Baxter is ready to hand the object.
Human grasp effort is detected and the participant took the object with ease
Human grasp effort is detected and the participant took the object with ease.

Hardware

a Force Sensing Resistor used to detect human grasp effort
A Force Sensing Resistor used to detect human grasp effort
Baxters gripper with a Force Sensing Resistor attached
Baxter’s gripper with a Force Sensing Resistor attached.
A Voltage Divider adapter connected to a PhidgetInterfaceKit board
To receive force values from a Force Sensing Resistor, a Voltage Divider adapter is connected to a PhidgetInterfaceKit board.

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